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Full text of "Galena, Illinois: An American heritage; highlights of its history, guide book and map"

Galena, Illinois: An Ame 
Heritage 



rican 



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ILLINOIS HISTORiSAL SU81EY 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign 



http://archive.org/details/galenaillinoisamOOcarr 



977.3343 
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AN AMERICAN HERITAGE 

Highlights of its History 

GUIDE BOOK and MAP 



HUMS HISTORICAL SIHBEf 



ON SCENIC U. S. 20 

The General U. S. Grant Highway 

THE GREAT RIVER ROAD 

the Scenic North-South highway 

served by 

ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD 
GREYHOUND BUS LINES 




AIR CONDITIONED or AIR COOLED ROOMS 



^ THE Q£j SOTO HOUSE nas maintained more than a century of 
continuous hospitality. It was the center of activities and festivities during 
the Civil War era. TODAY offers you a choice of 60 guest rooms, from 
modest to the finest! TV and free parking. 

CENTRALLY LOCATED 



GALENA— The Ideal Spot for Conventions, Vacation and weekends. 
Tourist Information and Convention Bureau. 
Write to: — De Soto House, Galena, Illinois 



Copyright Virginia R. Carroll 1961 



^17^33 H3 



Jbw. ftw 



MANITOUMI LAND --THE LAND OF GOD 







GALENA was a lusty roaring boom-border river port, and a supply depot for the North 
west territory, when Chicago was little more than a crossroad. 



THE INDIANS believed that "Man- 
itou" — the Great Spirit — dwelled in this 
hilly paradise nestled between the Rock, 
Mississippi and Wisconsin Rivers. 

LEAD, FUR, AND THE RIVER 
brought the earliest white settlers, and 
by 1830 the area population was close tc 
10,000. River traffic increased steadily 
until the late 1850's with commercial 
steamers and regular packet service op- 
erating from Galena south to St. Louis 
and north to St. Paul. 

GALENA'S MARKETS via this 
water route were far flung, — thru New 
Orleans to the eastern seaboard and 
thence on to European ports. Between 
1850 and 1860 Galena was the lead min- 
ing capital of the country and the com- 
mercial capital of the Upper Mississippi 
River Valley. 



THE RAILROADS which brought 
growth and greatness to Chicago, sealed 
the doom of Galena's commercial domi- 
nance. Traffic on the river route de- 
clined as trade of the interior states was 
shipped overland to the seaboard via rail, 
military roads, and subsequently by high- 
ways. 

THIS CHANGE in the pattern of 
trade routes in the decade preceding 1860, 
gradually severed the economic cord 
which previously had bound the upper 
Mississippi Valley states to the southern 
states. 

IN RETROSPECT we can see how 
this east-west ribbon of rail brought the 
northern states closer together in eco- 
nomic dependence, and THEREBY 
STRENGTHENED SUPPORT OF THE 
UNION DURING THE CIVIL WAR 
YEARS. 



LEAD WAS THE MAGNET THAT BROUGHT 
THE FIRST SETTLERS 



THE PRESENCE OF LEAD ORE 
in the upper Mississippi Valley (now 
parts of Iowa, Wisconsin and Illinois) 
was reported by French explorers as ear- 
ly as 1658. This was the first major lead- 
producing section in the United States. 

THE PROMISE OF WEALTH 

brought men from all directions to claw 
at the earth's surface in the hope of 
striking "pay dirt." 

THE MISSISSIPPI BUBBLE 

The Galena mine area was included 
in that famous wildcat promotion scheme 
launched in 1717, when glowing tales of 
the rich mineral fields of the upper Mis- 
sissippi Valley reached John Law, Scotch 
adventurer in Paris, France Fraudu- 
lently claiming that this rich mineral 
area was under development by his "Com- 
pany of the West" his stocks pyramided, 
then collapsed, and the "Mississippi 
Bubble" was broken. 

ILLINOIS— THE "SUCKER" STATE 

Many of the early Fever River pros- 
pectors traveled overland in covered wag- 
ons; others came by keelboat. Some 
brought their families and only enough 
supplies for the summer months. These 
southerners could not stand the severe 
Illinois winters, so they worked the mines 
in the summer and fall, returning to 
their homes before winter set in. 

They were dubbed "Suckers" after 
the migratory fish that seasonally trav- 
eled up and down the mighty Mississippi. 
From this origin Illinois is still called the 
"Sucker" state; Illinoisans are referred 
to as "Suckers". 

"GALENA" IS BORN! 

Mining proved so lucrative that by 
1826 not only miners but farmers, mer- 
chants, mechanics, and professional men 
were arriving in Galena in large num- 
bers. Often a farmer following his plow 



would hear the rumble caused by a min- 
er's blast deep below his furrow. 

It was December 27, 1826, when the 
mining settlement known as "LaPointe" 
kicked off its swaddling clothes and be 
came a town named "Galena". A town 
which within a year mushroomed into a 
hundred and fifteen houses and stores. 



THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT 
granted leases to early miners, calling 
for a ten percent royalty on the lead 
produced; later the rate was reduced to 
six percent. However, collecting the roy- 
alty was not successful, and the Govern- 
ment decided, in 1847, to sell the lands 
outright. 



By the 1850's mining became costlier 
as the shallow diggings were worked out, 
and expensive machinery became neces- 
sary for depth mining. 

LEAD AND ZINC are currently be- 
ing mined in this area, by Eagle-Picher 
Company and by Tri-State Zinc Inc. 




Illinois Central Engine at Galena, 
beside the scale used to weigh pig lead — 
when Galena area supplied more than 80 
percent of this country's lead output. 



STEAMBOAT ROUND THE BEND! 




SIDNEY — Stemwheel packet and excursion paddleboat. Wood hull 221.3' x 35.5', en- 
gines 17's, 5Vfe* stroke, four boilers. 

Sounds of the calliope and strains of 
sweet music from the band wafted on the 
breeze when sidewheeler and sternwheel 
paddleboats appeared as beautiful swan- 
like visions floating regally on the water 
with paddlewheels churning a misty 
spray. 

Steamers pulled into the Galena levee 
with banners streaming, flags flying and 
bands playing — amid the huzzas of the 



passengers and those lined at the shore. 
On special occasions the cannon of the 
city guards thundered its throaty wel- 
come. 

ULYSSES S. GRANT was thirty- 
eight years old when he moved to Galena 
— in 1860 — arriving with his wife and 
their four small children, aboard the 
"Itasca". 




i.i ITASCA 




ITASCA Sidewheet packet, wood hull (1857-1868), 230* x 35', Engines 22' s,l-ft. stroke, 
4 boilers, 560 tons. Paddlewheels 28* diameter, 10* buckets. 



illustrations Courtesy Steamboat Photo Bank 



THE "IRON HORSE" 



CHANGED THE TIDE OF TRAVEL AND COMMERCE 




The Illinois Central's No. 1 



Thousands of people came to Galena, 
"The First American Klondike", by 
conestoga wagon, buckboard, on horse- 
back, by foot, and by steamboat. They 
came from all parts of this country and 
from European countries. 

In 1825 Oliver Kellogg broke a wagon 
trail from Peoria to Dixon and on to 
Galena, but travel was slow, hazardous 
and seasonal. 

The year of 1850 marked the real be- 
ginning of the railway era in Illinois. 
The Illinois Central launched a wide- 
spread publicity campaign, drawing at- 
tention to climate, resources and oppor- 
tunity in this then "far west" country. 

ADVERTISEMENTS carrying illus- 
trations of farm crops, cattle grazing on 
fertile prairies, scenes of peace and 
plenty, beckoned hardy sons of toil to 
Illinois, "The Garden of America". 

Later the Illinois Central Railroad sold 
land to these settlers at $1.25 per acre. 
Purchase could be made at 50c down pay- 
ment per acre, with seven years in which 
to pay the remainder. Holders of govern- 
ment script could purchase land for 62^c 
per acre. 

BUILDING A PIONEER RAILROAD 
was a formidable undertaking. The work 
was done by men of brawn and courage, 
with shovels, picks, crow bars and sledge 
hammers. Hundreds of oxteams and 
horse-teams were required to transport 
materials and supplies. 
As many as ten thousand workmen were 
employed at one time on different sec- 
tions of track. 



AT 41/2 P- M. ON NOVEMBER 8, 1854, 
A THIRTEEN-GUN SALUTE AN- 
NOUNCED ARRIVAL OF THE ILLIN- 
OIS CENTRAL TRAIN IN GALENA, 
CARRYING DIGNITARIES AND OUT- 
OF-TOWN GUESTS WHO CAME 
HERE TO CELEBRATE COMPLE- 
TION OF THE IRON RAILS LINKING 
GALENA WITH CHICAGO AND THE 
EAST COAST. 

A PROCESSION FORMED AT THE 
RAILROAD DEPOT THEN MARCHED 
TO THE DESOTO HOUSE WHERE 
THE BANQUET WAS HELD IN THE 
300-SEAT DINING ROOM. 



HARDY PIONEERS TRANSFORMED 
ILLINOIS from a desolate prairie. 
Houses, schools and churches were erec- 
ted near the little wooden railroad sta- 
tions, and streets were platted. 

THE "CIVILIZING RAILS" brought 
people from every walk of life. Settle- 
ments mushroomed into towns, and 
between 1850 and 1860 "the population 
of Illinois more than doubled" 

DEPENDABLE YEAR-AROUND RAIL 
SERVICE by all railroads aided agri- 
cultural and industrial expansion and 
contributed to the prosperity and growth 
of the United States. 




ILLINOIS CENTRAL ENGINE 1380; 
an American-type locomotive, with a 
4-4-0 wheel arrangement. 

Illustrations Courtesy Illinois State Historical Library 



awstv* 




View of Galena during the romantic era when all upper Mississippi River 
traffic registered cargo at the U. S. Customs office here. 



GALENA — County seat of Jo Daviess County. Cradled in majestic 
hills "The Town That Time Forgot" is a living picture of a fabulous 
era in the midwest's great historic past. NATIONALLY KNOWN. 



■*_^5^- s 




PICK AND SHOVEL DAYS AT THE KIPP MINE 

Mineral was brought to the surface in wooden tubs, where it was washed 

to separate the mineral from the dirt. 




GRANT HOME STATE MEMORIAL 



Rociford, i: 



THE 18TH PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED 
STATES LIVED HERE! April 27, 1957 Gov- 
ernor William G. Stratton dedicated the 12- 
room Victorian house, which was restored 
by the Illinois Department of Conservation. 
The occasion was the Third Annual U. S. 
Grant Pilgrimage; 900 Boy Scouts and Ex- 
plorers participated in the dedication cere- 
monies. 



A TREASURE HOUSE OF EARLY AMER- 
ICANA! Outstanding among the more 
than 6,500 items, is the Thomas Nast 
life-size oil painting "Peace In Union." 

A "Civil War Room" places special em- 
phasis on participation by residents of Jo 
Daviess County. 




GALENA HISTORICAL MUSEUM 



AN ARCHITECTURAL GEM 

Hon. E. B. Washburne was Secretary of 
State under President U. S. Grant. Later 
he was U. S. Ambassador to the Court 
of France. 





E. B. WASHBURNE HOME 



From this home "Captain" U. S. Grant 
answered President Abraham Lincoln's 
jw&fc5&i^$w»^L& call for 75,000 men to save the Union. 



Pre-war home of Ulysses S. Grant family 



THE MAGIC CARPET ! 

YOU WILL LONG REMEMBER GALENA! It is mellow with the tones which only 
the Master Painter can create; and situated in a scenic region the Indians called Mani- 
toumi Land, the "Land of God". 

The rich mineral resources lured men, and in the 1820's several thousands came here, 
making it the richest town in the State. The fabulous paddleboat era swept the town 
into its "Golden Decade of the Forties" as the most important commercial point on the 
upper Mississippi River north of St. Louis. 

Galena is fascinating! It defies the description of Illinois as a "Prairie State". Nestling 
in the hills, it is surrounded by unsurpassed natural beauty, and within the town 
architectural treasures clinging to the hillsides - combined with its rich historic treas- 
ures - create an Old World charm. 

In this shrine-dotted town you will be awakened to a new kinship with early pioneers 
and a deep feeling of awe. At the leisurely pace of yesteryear it will inspire you and 
give you a deep feeling of reverence. 

This American Heritage recalls a way of life more than a century ago, and a deep ap- 
preciation of the struggles of pioneers clearing the land, building homes in the architec- 
ture of their old world homelands. It will turn your thoughts to the romance, the ad- 
venture, and the culture of that era, when they mined for lead, engaged in riverboat 
commerce, built roads, and by their dreams and their efforts left their imprint in the 
development of this great nation. 

These were the men and women that played an important part in the Civil War. Galena 
and this area contributed many great personalities to the Union, and it later was from 
here that "Captain" Ulysses S. Grant left in 1861, later to become the greatest North- 
ern General. 

This too was the town from which U. S. Grant left in 1869 to take office as 18th Presi- 
dent of the United States. 

Galena citizens are humbly proud of their heritage, and God-given natural resources 
and scenic terrain. They are aware of the physical reminders here today for the teach- 
ing of visual history of our American ideals. 



History walks with you, as monuments to an illustrious past break through 
at every turn. Here you will see original landmarks lived in by pioneers. 
Architectural treasures, quaint nineteenth century charm and an air of 
tranquility, are a pleasant relief from today's fast tempo of living. 



THE ROAD TO ADVENTURE 

leads to 

GALENA ! 

Hospitable hotels and motels offer a selection of accommodations; restaurants of- 
fer a variety of menus! Antique stores invite the antique-seeker! A novel shopping 
center on quaint Main Street mingles with scenic and historic points of interest. 

YEAR AROUND RECREATIONAL FACILITIES - Three parks, a swimming 
pool, outdoor roller skating rink, daily fee golf course and bowling alley. Game and pan 
fish. Fine hunting, including duck and deer hunting. View the shoreline of the mighty 
Mississippi, from the deck of an excursion boat. Marine harbor now being developed. 
Camping facilities, and picnicking locales nearby. 



CHESTNUT HILLS 
miles from Galena. 



winter ski area and summer recreational facilities, nine 



GALENA, located in the northwestern corner of Illinois, is centrally located for 
many circular drives in nearby Iowa and Wisconsin as well as in Illinois. For instance, 
Crystal Lake Cave in Dubuque, Iowa, The Grotto at Dickeyville, or Nelson Dewey Home 
and Park at Cassville, Wisconsin. Or continue your drive to Prairie du Chien, and return 
to Galena on the Iowa side of the Mississippi River. Apple River Canyon State Park, 
the Mississippi Palisades are just a short, but scenic, drive from here. 

YOU WILL ENJOY YOUR STAY IN GALENA! Bring the family, and your 
camera or palette! For special Galena events, check the Calendar of Events in the 
back of this book. 




PEACE IN UNION 

LIFE-SIZE OIL PAINTING IN GALENA MUSEUM 

It was presented to the City of Galena by H. H. Kohlsaat at the 1895 Grant Birthday 
ceremonies. The artist, Thomas Nast of Civil War fame, was present. Illustration, courtesy 
Illinois State Library. 



A, E-2 U. S « 2 BRIDG E Main St, 
GaLENA - a boonTriver town when Chicago was a 
swamp. The now-narrowed Galena River was once 
more than 340 feet wide, and upon its crest float- 
ed palatial steamers and heavily loaded packets ♦ 

B, D-2 THE LEVE E was the pulse of Galena; 
the river was its route to and from its far-flung 
market s. As many as eighteen steamers were tied 
up at one time loading or unloading at the levee. 

C, C-2 LOUISVILLE HOUSE 601 S.Main 
Privately owned. Built in the 1820 T s as an hotel 
for river and stagecoach travellers. 

D« C-2 T HE FLOOD GATES can be closed in event 
of flood. The Galena River has at times given 
forceful reminders of its turbulent past. 

CENTURY OLD BUILDINGS frame Galena ! s bow-shaped 
Main Street - mute testimony to her once booming 
industries in the days when all upper Mississippi 
River traffic registered in the U. S. Customs 
Office here. 

E. C-2 FLOOD PROTECTION DIKE The dike and the 
20-foot high gates at the south entrance to this 
town, protect the business district from flood. 

F. C-2 OLD GRAIN HOUSES The four 4- story 
buildings on the West side of Main Street in the 
500 block. Heavily loaded wagons once lined Bench 
Street, waiting to be unloaded. Grain was dropped 
from the 3rd floor Bench Street entrance to the 
Main Street level of these warehouses. Then the 
grain was sacked and loaded on barges bound for 
distant markets. 

G. C-2 COMMISSION HOUSE 420 S. Main 
Here waterfront business was transacted when 
Galena f s warehouses were a market well worth 
cultivating. 

GALENA of 1858 was a metropolis of the northwest. 
It supported two daily newspapers, and a dozen 
mills were operated here. Lumber yards, brick 
and lime kilns, seven breweries, pottery shops, 



three soap and candle factories, wagon shops, and 
three leather finishing houses, were doing a 
"land office n business* 

1> C-2 DESOTO HOUSE corner Main and Green Sts. 
In April 1855 the 240 room DeSoto House, with 
accommodations for four hundred guests, opened 
as the "largest hotel in the West". Six to seven 
hundred persons were arriving daily by riverboat, 
stagecoach and railroad, and rooms in this magni- 
ficient House were in great demand. 

Abraham Lincoln spoke from the now-removed balcony 
in 1S56. Ulysses S.Grant maintained his 1363 pres- 
idential headquarters here. The DeSoto House was 
the scene of many resplendent military cotillions 
during the Civil War era. 

These original walls have echoed to stirring de- 
bates of national trends, inspired by voices of 
the wise and learned leaders in culture, music, 
art, philosophy and statesmanship. 

As Galena T s population and prestige declined, 
there was no longer need for such a large hostelry 
In 1830 the two upper stories, closed since 1875, 
were removed. The seventy remaining rooms are now 
individually appointed for the modern comforts of 
today f s travellers. 

2. C-2 U.S. POST OFFICE Green St. 
Constructed as a Customs House in I858, for use 
of the river traffic. Erected under the direction 
of Ely S. Parker, a full-blooded educated Indian 
of the Seneca Tribe. He was Brigadier General and 
Military Secretary for General U. S. Grant. 

3. C-2 THE GENERAL STORE S« Main 
A facinating, well-stocked reconstructed General 
Store, 0ffice,?ar Room and Kitchen. 

4. C-2 GALENA GAZETTE & ADVERTISER 222 S. Main 
Founded 1834; second oldest newspaper in Illinois. 



i 



C-3 GRANT LEATHER STORE 211 S. Main 
reconstructed Leather Store of the 1860's. 



6. C-2 FRINK- WALKER STAGE LINE 212 S.Main 
Site of the Stage Depot, Hall and Tavern. Frink- 
Walker sent the first stagecoach from Galena to 
Chicago in 1836. By 1857 fifteen stage lines 
radiated from this town. 

7 . C-2 Site of J ,R, GRANT STORE 120 S. Main 
See D.A.R. placque. It was here that Ulysses S. 
Grant worked for his father, from the spring of 
1860 to the spring of 1861. 

8. B-3 THE CRACK POT ANTIQUES 116 S. Main 

9. B-3 OLD MARKET HOUSE Commerce & Perry. 
Opened June 27, 1846 o This Greek Revival struc- 
ture is the oldest Market House in the Midwest* A 
State Memorial; free admission© 

10. B-3 MARKET SQUARE 

Matrons in hoopskirts and shawls mingled on the 
square with heavily-clad farmers, rough looking 
miners in ocher-stained flannel shirts and heavy 
leather boots, and Indians in colorful blankets. 

For a daily fee of 250 a farmer could park on the 
square and sell his farm produce direct from his 
wagon to the bustling crowd. The latest gossip 
and heated discussions of current topics, could 
always be heard "on the square". 

11 o B-3 THE LAST COBBLESTONE STREET 

Perry Street between Main & Bench Streets . 

12. B-3 AMOS FARRAR CABIN 208 Perry 
Open to the public. The present house is built 
around the log cabin which stood inside THE OLD 
STOCKADE. During the Indian uprising it was a 
shelter for women and children. See D.A.R. placque, 

13. B-3 FIRST POST OFFICE 200 N. Main 
Now Robertson's Drug Store. On June 4, 1826 the 
first post office in Galena was located on this 
site; known as the "Fever River" post office. 

14 o B-3 2nd COUNTY COURTHOUSE 216 N. Main 
Erected l83^u Now J. P. Vincent & Sons Monument 
V/orks. Half of this building was rented to the 



County for use as a courthouse • It held the first 
theater of the lead mining area, in I838, when 
the Jefferson-McKenzie Players came from Chicago 
in open wagons to play in Galena. 

15 o B-3 DOWLING'S STONE STORE Diagonal St. 
Erected 1826; the oldest stone structure remain- 
ing in Galena. In its day of log cabins it was 
unique due to its heavy walls of native stone. 

16. B-3 DOWLING SHOP ANTIQUES Diagonal St. 

17 • A-4 OLD TOWN Broadway Ave. 

See the old street lights, small parkway in the 
center of the street, framing the old and quaint 
buildings. This was the original site of the city. 
In the early days a cooper shop, a tannery, a saw- 
mill and a smelter operated here. Expansion of 
industries caused building of the business section 
in its present location. 

18. B-4 PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE across Galena River 
Located at the site of the 1647 Meeker Street 
Toll Draw-Bridge. 

19 . A-4 SWIMMING POOL 

Located two blocks north of the Pedestrian Bridge $ 
on the Scales Mound Road. At the site of the old 
Fair Grounds. 

20. A-3 JO DAVIESS COUNTY COURT HOUSE 
Erected 1639 312 N. Bench 
Captain U. S. Grant offered his West Point train- 
ing and Mexican War experience at a mass meeting 
held here in April 1661. when President Abraham 
Lincoln called for 75*000 volunteers to save the 
Union. 

21. A-3 ST. MARY'S CATHOLIC CHURCH 400 Franklin . 
Founded 1850. In 1856 the first brick edifice was 
erected following plans by Father Samuel Charles 
Mazzuchelli, 0. P. 

22. B-3 TAYLOR HOUSE ANTIQUES 201 N. Bench 
Special Christmas Room! Victorian RoomI Eagles 
Roost I Party Paper RoomI Village Store I and 
the Littlest Import Shop I 



23 . B-2 DOWLING HOUSE 120 N .Bench 

A storybook house; erected 1847 ♦ Privately owned. 
Parts of this house were used as description for 
the home of fictional Abby Delight, the heroine 
of Janet Ayer Fairbanks 1 popular novel of 1932- 
"The Bright Land." 

2k. B-2 FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 108 N. Bench 
Founded 1828. Erected 1838. The oldest Presby- 
terian Church in Illinois in continuous use. The 
"Guild" of this church sponsors the Annual Pilgri« 
mage through Historic Homes f 

25. B-2 GALENA FIRE STATION 101 S. Bench 
The city is speedily and efficiently protected 
by our Volunteer Fire Department. 

26. B-2 GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH 109 S . Prospect 
Founded 1827. Erected 1847. A grey stone, vine 
covered edifice, buttressed and castellated in 
Tudor style. Stained glass windows imported from 
Belgium; magnificient alter, reredos and choir 
stalls of hand carved black walnut. The delicate 
silvery tones of the 1838 one-manual organ have 
been strengthened by an alectric blower. 

27. A-2 BLACK HAWK WAR MEMORIAL S. Prospect 
In 1832 Galena became a fortified military cam£>. 
A runway was built from this military out- 
look post to the Amos Farrar cabin inside the old 
stockade. Bouldar marker placed by the D.A.R. 

28. A-2 DR. EDW. KITTOE HOME 105 High 
He was surgeon & Medical Director of the Army of 
Tennessee; a Lieut. Col. on Grant's staff. 

29. A-l GEN. JOHN A. RAWLIN'S HOME 517 Hill 
He was Chief of Grant T s war staff; and Secretary 
of War during Grant f s presidency. 

30. A-l GEN. WM. R. ROWLEY HOME 515 Hill 
Clerk of the Circuit Court. A Brigadier General 
& Provost Marshal on Grant's staff. 

31. VILLAGE BARN & LITTLE ACRES 

(not shown on map. Highway 20-W at Division 
Location of "Country Fair" on specified dates. 



32 « A-l 1812 CEMETERY Washington & Dodge 
In this pioneer cemetery are the graves of many 
first settlers. 



33. B-l GRANT'S PRE-WAR HOME 121 High 

D,A,R. placqued. Captain Grant left from this 
home in l86l« to enter the Federal Army, 



34 , B-l ST, MATTHEW 1 S LUTHERAN CHURCH 127 High 
Organized September 22, 1858. 

35, C-l A SCENIC VIEW The plaza in front of 
the Central Elementary School is a vantage point 
from which to view the valley and hills beyond, 

36, C-l WHITE HOUSE ANTIQUES 413 S. Prospect 
In 1833 Dan Wann contracted for construction of 
this house© Instead of cash, payment was stipu - 
lated as n ,,lead delivered at the Galena wharf n . 



37, C-l THE SCHOOL STEPS Green St, 
Numerous such stairways carry pedestrians , 

38, B-2 QUALITY HILL S, Prospect 
The roaring life of the mines and river trade 
brought wealth, and M Quality Hill" grew, blending 
a new way of living with an Old World nostalgia, 

39, C-l METHODIST MANSE S, Prospect 
Privately owned. This former Methodist manse 
was the home of Bishop Vincent, founder of the 
National Chatauqua, 

40, B-2 FELT'S FOLLY 125 S, Prospect 
Privately owned, Victorian mansion, built in the 
1840 f s by Lucius Felt, The stone steps, costing 
$40,000, were dubbed "Felt's Folly". 

The house has a ballroom in the mansard. It con- 
tains 23 rooms including seven bedrooms with 
original marble washstands, A pretentious home 
with beautiful landscaped gardens. 



OUR SPIRITUAL HERITAGE 




FIRST METHODIST CHURCH 

Founded 1829 

Spiritual home of the Ulysses S. Grant 

family. Their pew is appropriately placqued. 

125 S. Bench Street (Map No. 42 B-2) 











FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

Founded 1828 Erected 1838 

108 N. Bench St. (Map No. 24 B-2) 



GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

Founded 1827 Erected 1847 

109 S. Prospect St. (Map No. 26 B-2) 



THESE MORE-THAN-CENTURY-OLD CHURCHES 
INVITE YOU TO WORSHIP WITH THEM 




HILL PRESBYTERIAN 
CHURCH 

West St. near Washington St. 

(Located beyond the limits of 

the attached map) 




SOUTH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
Founded January 5, 1846 Erected 1847 

513 South Bench Street (Map No. 51 D-l) 

In September 1960 the South Presbyterian Church 
and the Hill Presbyterian church united, and now are 
known as the WESTMINSTER UNITED PRESBY- 
TERIAN CHURCH. 





ST. MARY'S CATHOLIC CHURCH 

Founded 1850 
400 Franklin Street (Map No. 42 A-3) 




ST. MICHAEL'S CATHOLIC CHURCH 
Founded 1832 217 S. Bench Street 

(Map No. 47 C-2) 



ST. MATTHEW'S EVANGELICAL 

LUTHERAN CHURCH 

127 High Street Map No. 34 B-l 





For new vistas in a variety vacationland, 
THE GREAT RIVER ROAD 



Along this 573-mile scenic corridor are numerous State Parks and Memorials, 
photo-scenic lookout spots offering magnificent panoramic views, Indian Mounds, his- 
toric and architectural treasures. 

Sportsminded travelers will find good hunting and fishing, harbor and boat 
launching facilities and waterfront recreation, a variety of nature trails, picnic and 
camping sites. Numerous spring and fall festivals are held in towns along this route. 

Nineteen hundred pilot wheel markers, from East Dubuque to Cairo, will guide 
motorists. On the 1961 official Illinois Highway Department maps, the route of the 
GREAT RIVER ROAD is identified with miniature reproductions of the markers. 



41. B-2 TURNER HALL 103 S. Bench 
Has many historic associations • Though gutted by 
fire and remodeled since it was built in 1S74, 
this auditorium with its double-decked boxes be- 
side the stage, recalls the hey-dey of the Victor- 
ian stage. 

42. B-2 FIRST METHODIST CHURCH 125 S. Bench 
Founded 1S29. Spiritual home of the U. S. Grant 
family. Their pew is appropriately placquedo 

43. C-2 WASHINGTON ST. STEPS S. Bench 
The path taken by U. S. Grant from his home on 
High Street, to the J.R.Grant Store on Main St. 

44. C-2 FIRE HOUSE No. 1 S. Bench 
Six such small structures housed the hand- drawn 
equipment, so that apparatus would not have to be 
drawn long distances. 

Inside, can be seen a hand-drawn and manually 
operated 1#55 pumper used by our volunteer fire- 
men. In the bell tower hangs the last old fire 
bell in Galena. The Galena Volunteer Fire Com- 
pany was organized February 1, 1#30. 

45. C-2 HISTORICAL MUSEUM 211 S. Bench 
This building houses the City Hall, Community 
Hall and the Museum. Outstanding among the more 
than 65OO items of early Americana and the Civil 
War era, is the life-size oil painting "Peace 
in Union" depicting Lee f s surrender to Grant at 
Appomatox. 

46. C-2 CROSS THE STREET 

See the row of brick houses recreating an Old 
World Atmosphere. Here the Bench street entrance 
to Main Street buildings, is by narrow bridges 
from the sidewalk to the houses. 

47. C-2 ST. MICHAEL 1 S CHURCH 217 S. Bench 
The "cradle of Catholicity" in the Northwest. 
This was a flourishing parish before the first 
Catholic church was founded in Chicago. Father 
Samuel Charles Mazzuchelli, 0. P., was its most 
renouned Pastor. 



48. C-2 THE NEWHALL HOME 235 S. Bench 

Erected 1847 by Dr. Horatio Newhall, a pioneer 
physician. Verandas were added in the 1690s. 
A massive structure, topped by an octagonal 
cupola. Now, the Nash Funeral Home • 



& 



C-2 CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 301 S. Bench 
rganized September 10, 1944* 



50. B-l ST. MICHAEL'S PAROCHIAL SCHOOL 

Since l880 o 413 S. Bench 

51. D-l SOUTH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 513 S. Bench 
Founded Jan. 5* 1846. Erected 1847 o Members of 
this church sponsor the Violet Show and Old South 
Activities annually held on "Tour Weekend". 

52. D-l FELT CARNEGIE LIBRARY 601 S. Bench 
Organized 183 5 • Building erected 1908. 

53. D-l FREDERICK STAHL HOME 603 S. Bench 
Erected 1834 • Privately owned. He took the first 
load of lead from here to Chicago in 1833 j at the 
time the Potawattomie Treaty was made. He loaded 
the wagons, drawn by two eight-oxen teams, with 
3500 pounds of lead each, and travelled via Dixon. 

54 o D-l THE OLD STORE - ANTIQUES 334 Spring 

55. E-l JOHN E. SMITH HOME 807 S» Bench 
Erected in the 1850 f s. He operated a jewelry and 
silversmith store in Galena at the start of the 
Civil War. A Major-General on Grant f s staff. 



ON THE EAST SIDE 

56. E-3 E. B. WASHBURNE HOME 908 Third 
Privately owned. Built in 1833; remodeled and en- 
larged in the l850 f s. On the lawn of this South- 
ern Colonial residence Grant drilled the first 
raw recruits from this area in f 6l. E.B.Washburne 
served eighteen years in Congress. He was U.S. 
Ambassador to the Court of France during Grant f s 
administration. 



57 . E-3 ILLINOIS CENTRAL RAILROAD DEPOT 

Foot of Bouthillier St. 
In 1854 the "Iron Horse 11 of the "Central" rail- 
road roared across the prairie into this raetrop - 
olis of the midwest. General Grant alighted at 
the Illinois Central Station August IS, 1865. He 
departed from here to take office as 18th presi- 
dent of the United States. 

58. D-3 GRANT PARK Park Ave at Jackson St . 
Dedicated in 1891, when the first U.S.Grant Cele- 
bration was held. See the bronze memorial statue 
"Grant - our Citizen". The Fountain was present- 
ed to the city by the G.A.R. Ladies Auxiliary • 
Canons can be seen here from the Civil War, the 
Spanish American War, and World War I . 



59 D-3 PANORAMIC VIEW A favorite spot 
for artists and camera enthusiasts. Looking 
westward the beauty of the town stands out as in 
a mural. 



60. D-4 CAPT. ORRIN SMITH HOME 

S.E. Corner Jackson & Park Av. 
He was a wealthy, colorful and pious boatman. 
Where ever his boat might be at midnight Saturday 
night, she was tied up, and not moved again un- 
til after midnight Sunday night. If no minister 
was available Cap f t Smith led religious service • 

61. C-4 THE ROCK HOUSE ANTIQUES Third St. 

62. C-4 THE UNION HOUSE 403 Park Av. 
When built in 1839, this was a tavern accommoda - 
ting four boarders. A stairway led from the 
rear porch to the river below© 

63 . D-4 GRANT HOME STATE MEMORIAL 

Bouthillier St. 
This is the home that the citizens of Galena 
presented to General U. S. Grant on August 18, 
I865, when he returned from the Civil War. Now a 
State Memorial; admission free. 



GENERAL GRANT DANCED AT THE DESOTO HOUSE 

An Illinois Central "Special" - on September 11, 1865 - brought some forty military and 
civilian dignitaries from Chicago to attend the Complimentary Ball and Banquet honor- 
ing General U. S. Grant. 

Five hundred invitations were extended for the great occasion. Major General John A. 
Logan spoke from the DeSoto House balcony, sustaining his refutation as an orator! 

The great dining hall of the DeSoto House was superbly decorated. Flags of every de- 
scription were festooned upon the pillars, and portraits of Grant and Logan and other 
generals adorned the walls. Muskets were stacked around the hall ; and a huge Ameri- 
can Eagle in bronze perched on a pedestal. The banquet table was lavishly and elegant- 
ly spread. 

The assembled military personnel included Major General Mason Brayman, Col. Orville 
E. Babcock, Col. Adam Badeau, Majors J. R. Hotallmg, J, B. Dent f and S. Wait. 
Governor Richard J. Oglesby, Secretary of State 0, M, Hatch, and State Treasurer 
Sharon Tyndale were among the dignitaries. The press was represented by Sam J. Me- 
dill of the Chicago Tribune, and by reporters of more than a half dozen other news- 
papers. 

General Grant tripped the light fantastic with the guests, then at 1:00 a. m. he with 
his family and staff withdrew, while the rest of the party kept on with the dance until 
3:00 a.m. 

On the following morning General Grant and his party left for Springfield, Illinois 
and St. Louis, Missouri in the four magnificent coaches which the Illinois Central Rail- 
road furnished. 



ELECTION NIGHT REMINISCENCE 

Huge bonfires were lit on the hills, and residences were illuminated throughout the 
town. General Smith commanded the Galena Tanners, and Colonel Miller commanded 
the mounted artillery unit. The Galena Leadmine Band and the Dubuque Germania 
Band supplied the beat for the marching feet. 

Several thousands marched in the torchlight parade to the Bouthillier Street residence 
of Ulysses S. Grant. Enroute, a large unoccupied building had been set afire, and as 
the procession passed this structure every timber blazed #nd the flames lighted up the 
area. 

Three rousing cheers greeted the President-elect, and he made a brief speech from the 
piazza. The bands serenaded the future 18th President of the United States, and a mag- 
nificent display of fireworks was set off on the Grant home lawn. Within seconds after 
the signal Roman Candle was touched off, more than a thousand candles sent balls 
of fire into the air, shedding a brilliant light that illuminated the sky. 

Then the paraders moved on to the residence of Hon^. E. B. Washburne, who had just 
been elected to Congress for his 9th term. Cheered by the crowd, and seranaded by the 
bands, he responded with a brief and eloquent speech. 

A similiar ceremony was held at the home of Major General John E. Smith, then the 
torchlight paraders wound their way around town before disbanding. 



GALENA AND THE DESOTO HOUSE 
HAVE SHARED IN THE PAGEANT OF HISTORY 





Opened In April 1855 the 5 story. 240 room DeSoto House 
"the most luxurous hotel In the west." 



Ulysses S. Grant maintained hit 
1868 presidential campaign head- 
quarters at the DeSoto House 




On August 24, 1858 at 2 p.m. 
Stephen A. Douglass, "The Little 
Giant," addressed a mass meeting 
from this same balcony. 





Abraham Lincoln spoke from the 
(now removed) balcony July 23, 
1856. His closing sentence was 
later to become a civil war 
slogan: "All this talk about the 
dissolution of the Union is hum- 
bug—nothing but folly. We WON'T 
dissolve the Union, and you 
SHAN'T." 







By 1880 Galena's prosperity had faded, population and 
commerce declined, and the two upper stories (closed 
since 1875) were removed. 

The original roof was raised on screw Jacks, then 
lowered gradually as the two stories were removed. 



Of her it is said with no Idle boast, 

To men of great fame, she acted as host; 
With pride she can point to her chambers today. 
Where heroes renowned have once "hit the hay." 

Reprinted from "Rhythm of the River" 
with permission of author 







Ceremonies April 30, 1960, unveiling the Illinois State His- 
torical Society marker at the DeSoto House. At this 6th 
Annual U. S. Grant Pilgrimage 1703 Boy Scouts took part In the 
ceremonies. Dubuque Telegraph Herald Photo. 



U/tufflcunA Whan... toiSotb Hou/a Htetnu* 



II 






A 



GALENA SUNDAY APRIL 29™ 1855 

SOUP 

MACARONI SOUP 



BOILED BASS 

HAM 

CHICKEN 

TONGUE 



FISH 
BOILED 



BAKED SALMON 

CORNED BEEF 
LEGMUTON 



COLD 

CORNED BEEF 

ENTREES 

PORK AND GREENS 
BAKED PORK AND 

ROAST C^-3 

MUTTON 

PIG 

TURKEY 

VEGETABLES c^-3 

BOILED POTATOES TURNIPS 

MASHED POTATOES PARSNIP 

ASPARAGUS ONIONS 

PASTRY and PUDDING 

GRAPE PIE APPLE PIE 

GREEN PEACH PIE GAGE PLUM PIE 

PESSIRT 
NUTS ICE CREAM RAISINS 



HAM 



KIDNEY ANDPORK 
MUTTON CURRY 



BEEF 
PORK 
LAMB-MINT SAUCE 



IN 1855 A ROOM AT THElDiSotiv A WINE LIST SHOWS CHAMPAGNE SOLD 

HOUSE WAS PRICED TO INCLUDE FOUR AT*2*P A QUARTOS? A PINT. THATMADEIRO 

MEALS A AY. 'BREAKFAST b'6. TO 90 CLOCK, SOLD FOR *1<>o A QUART; S/8R0WN STOUT 

DINNER iJiOCLOCKj TEA fc'4 OCLOCK; SUPPER LONDONPORTER" LIKEWISE ALE, AT 75* A 

8 TO 9 0' CLOCK? B$Tfc ? #*°-° DAU Y 0} QUART. 

-OLD FASHIONED HOSPITALITY WITH MOOERN ACCOMMODATIONS 

c^~z* t)tSotb+hn4At *^-> 

230 SOUTH MAIN ST. OALENA ILLINOIS 

IN THE TOWN THAT TIME FORGOT 





¥ 



THE JO DAVIESS GUARD WAS DRILLED BY U. S. GRANT 



««»«»,, 



f 



. 







^Y% 




WilUa 



Prof. G. A. 

Godat. 



Herman 
Ulverer. 






m 



Ignatz 

Klein, 



Gen. A. L, 
Chetlats 



Bahwell 



Georg'e S, 
Avery. 




J. R. Lamb, 



Five thousand persons gathered on the 
25th of April 1861 to bid the 106-man JO 
DAVIESS GUARD "God Speed" when 
it departed from Galena for the battle- 
fields of the Civil War. 
Augustus L. Chetlain was the first man 
to sign the Muster Roll, closely followed 
by Wallace Campbell, J. Bates Dickson, 
and others. At Captain U. S. Grant's 
suggestion Augustus Chetlain was elec- 
ted Captain of the Company. Wallace 
Campbell was elected First Lieutenant, 
and J. Bates Dickson was elected Second 
Lieutenant. 

Patriotic women called upon Grant for 
advice regarding the correct regulation 
infantry uniform, then they solicited 
funds, bought material, commissioned 
tailors to cut the garments, and the 
women sewed the uniforms. Mean- 
while Grant drilled these men, and 
within a few days the company was uni- 
formed and ready to report at Spring- 
field for assignment. 
As departure hour arrived, the volun- 
teers marched to the depot along streets 
lined with cheering well-wishers. They 
were led by the Galena Brass Band, and 
followed by Liberty Fire Company No. 
1. They were flanked on the right by 
Neptune Fire Company No. 2, and on the 



left by Relief Hook & Ladder Co. No. 4. 
Members of Galena Fire Company No. 3 
were next in the procession, just ahead 
of the Schreiners Brass Band, who was 
followed by the German Societies, Mayor, 
City Council, representatives of civic or- 
ganizations and citizens. 

In front of the DeSoto House the proces- 
sion halted for brief ceremonies, at 
which a silk flag made by Galena ladies 
was presented to the Company. Mr. E. A. 
Small made the presentation and Cap- 
tain Augustus L. Chetlain gave the ac- 
ceptance speech. Captain U. S. Grant 
fell in at the rear left of the Company 
and marched with it across the Green 
Street Bridge to the Illinois Central 
Railroad Depot. Here brief addresses 
were given by Mayor Robert Brand and 
Rev. J. H. Vincent, and a revolver of 
rare workmanship was presented to 
Professor G. A. Godat, the color bearer. 
Of the sixty companies accepted by the 
State of Illinois, the Jo Daviess Guard 
was the only one to arrive in Camp 
Yates fully uniformed, and with military 
precision and discipline. The Jo Daviess 
Guard became Company F of the Twelfth 
Regiment, Illinois Infantry, assigned to 
the right center of the Regiment and 
designated as the "Color Company". 



GALENA WOMAN WAS A PRIVATE IN THE 
UNION ARMY 



Galena-born Clarissa Emily Gear 
Hobbs served with the boys in blue, 
travelling with her husband, Dr. J. C. H. 
Hobbs, M. D. In her Memoirs Mrs. 
Hobbs wrote: "The only way I could go 
with my husband was to have my name 
placed on the roster as a private soldier 
and detailed to work in the hospital. It 
was Col. Wood, a West Point man, who 
arranged the details; 'You can draw 
your rations as a soldier of the Iowa 
12th, have two blankets issued to you, 
and can go that way' ". 

Their first winter with troops was 
spent at the Regimental Hospital at St. 
Louis. In early January they were 
shipped to Smithland, Kentucky. Within 
a few hours after Northern Troops took 
Ft. Henry, the "Long Roll" sounded at 



Smithland. Soldiers left their sick beds 
to answer the call "to arms", rushing on 
to the transports waiting to carry them 
on to Fort Donelson on the Tennessee 
River. 

All night the hospital staff heard guns 
booming, and the next morning news 
came that Fort Donelson was captured 
by Union forces. Soon the transports 
returned to Smithland, flags at half- 
mast, filled with wounded soldiers. 

Mrs. Hobbs was recognized as a Nurse 
of the Iowa 12th, but at that time no 
provision had been made for nurses, and 
she wrote in her memoirs, "So I never 
got my $13.00 per month." She later re- 
ceived a government pension of $12.00 
monthly. 



Source: "Autobiography of Clarissa E. Gear Hobbs," Vol. 17 Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society. 



» I«f »» I «» I"I *' I"l *' I"I"I"I"I"I ' > I"H ' 4 '* I"H ' 



YOUTH ANSWERED LINCOLN'S CALL! 



THOMAS E. REYNOLDS of Galena, 
enlisted July 30, 1862, mustered in Sept. 
4, 1862; mustered out June 10, 1865. He 
served with the Ninety-sixth Infantry- 
Co. I. 

He enlisted as a Private at the age of 
17, but was detailed as Drummer, and 
served with the Regimental Band till the 



close of the war ; was never absent except 
for about three weeks in the spring of 
1863; was present and acted with the 
Ambulance Corps in every engagement 
in which the Regiment participated. 

His post-war activity was as a mem- 
ber of the firm of Fiddick & Reynolds, 
Boot and Shoe Dealers, Galena, Illinois. 



Chicago Historical Society Reference Report, from History of the Ninety-Sixth Regiment, Illinois Volunteer In- 
fantry. Edited by Charles A. Partridge. Brown, Pettibone & Co., Chicago: 1887. pb882. Also, Report of the Adjutant 
General of the State of Illinois Vol. V p 457. 



FLAG OF THE GALENA LEAD MINE REGIMENT 
Can be seen at the Galena Historical Museum. This was the first flag to enter 
Vicksburg when the city fell, July 4, 1863. The flag was brought to Galena 
by General Smith ; and loaned to the Museum by his grandson, W. K. K. Smith. 



THESE CIVIL WAR MILITARY LEADERS 
LEFT GALENA TO SERVE AND SAVE THE UNION 




John A. Rawlins 



ULYSSES S. GRANT 



William R. Rowley 




^ A 



John Carson Smith 



John E. Smith 



Ilustratlons: Courtesy Illinois State Historical Library— U. S. Grant, Ely S. Parker, John A. Rawlins, William R. 
Rowley and A. L. Chetlaln ■«.*«. 

Courtesy Chicago Historical Soclety-J. A. Maltby. John O. Duer, J. E. Smith and J. C. Smitn 



THE HERO'S WELCOME 




Grand triumphal arch across Main Street, welcoming General U. S. Grant home, — on 
the ISth day of August 1865. The five-story DeSoto House, shown above, was a beehive 
of activity. 



Grant and his party arrived in Ga- 
lena on a 3 p. m. Illinois Central "special" 
train. Twenty-five thousand persons 
welcomed him amid the firing of can- 
non, and waving of flags. Carriages con- 
veyed the General and his party from 
the depot to the DeSoto House, where 
ceremonies were held. The procession 
kept time to the music of the 15th Corps, 
the Germania, Dubuque and other bands. 

The triumphal arch was trimmed 
with evergreens, "emblematic of the nev- 
er fading honors that will encircle the 
brows of those that won them". A finely 
carved American Eagle, with the em- 
blems of victory and peace in its beak, 
was mounted on the arch overlooking the 



grandstand and crowd in the street be- 
low. 

On this arch stood thirty six young 
ladies dressed in white, each waving a 
national flag. As the General and Mrs. 
Grant approached they showered flowers 
along their pathway. The Hon. E. B. 
Washburne gave the welcoming address, 
and Rev. Vincent replied on behalf of 
Ulysses S. Grant. 

At the close of the ceremonies Grant 
received the key to the home on the East 
side of the Galena River, — which is now 
known as the GRANT HOME STATE 
MEMORIAL. Taking up residence in his 
new home, he was once again "Grant — 
Our Citizen". 



GRANT'S HOME LIFE DURING ELECTION WEEK 



While a nation waited for the decisive election day, 
activities of Ulysses S. Grant in his home town. 



'Leslie Illustrated" sent a photographer to record the 
—"Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper Nov. 14, 1868 




A FAMILIAR SCENE in Galena even during election 
week. Grant's dally schedule remained unchanged. 
After lunch he rested or walked or went for a 
carriage drive. 





PRESIDENT ELECT U. S. GRANT maintained his 
1868 election campaign Headquarters at the 
DESOTO HOUSE. Here he Is shown chatting with 
the desk clerk. 



This Is the 1857 home which the local 
presented to Grant August 18. 1865, when he re- 
turned to Galena — the foremost military figure of 
Ws century. 
It is now the U. S. GRANT HOME, a state memorial 



GRANT HOME IN GALENA AND THE 
FAMILY COAT OF ARMS 





PS 






R| 



DEAR TO GRANTS HEART was the twlghllght hours when family and friends gathered at THE FIRESIDE CIRCLE. 
Illustrations Courtesy Illinois State Historical Library 




ULYSSES S. GRANT 

18th President of the United States 
1869 - 1877 



"// the people want me, they'll elect 
me", Grant said. While his opponent 
stumped vigorously, General U. S. Grant 
remained in Galena, quiet and unassum- 
ing as always. The president-elect main- 
tained personal headquarters at the De- 
Soto House. A Republican nominee, he 
was inevitable choice for President. 

HISTORIANS HAVE RECORDED: 

HIS PRIMARY CONCERN was for 
the public debt, and during his two ad- 
ministrations the national debt and taxes 
were reduced. 

HE WAS THE FIRST PRESI- 
DENT to propose a Civil Service based 
on merit; this much needed reform was 
finally accepted in 1883. 

IN 1871 HE SECURED RATIFI- 
CATION of the Treaty of Washington, 
and the United States and Great Britain 
were the first countries to set an example 
to the world of "settlement by arbitra- 
tion". 



OTHER ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF 
HIS ADMINISTRATION included (a) 
an Indian Commission to improve the lot 
of the Indians; (b) establishment of Yel- 
lowstone National Park; (c) the study 
of water resources and problems of a 
watershed in California; (d) his efforts 
in behalf of better educational facilities; 
(e) his partially successful efforts to es- 
tablish a merchant marine; (f ) the enun- 
ciation of a tariff policy; and (g) pro- 
vision for an orderly and peaceful suc- 
cession after a contested presidential 
election. 

HIS VISION WENT BEYOND 
HIS GENERATION, and many of the 
measures he favored were not adopted 
until after his administration ended. 

Some of these were (a) the estab- 
lishment of a naval base; (b) a market 
for the mutual exchange of trade with 
the Carribbean; (c) construction of an 
isthmian canal; (d) an organization for 
the settlement of international disputes, 
and many others. 



Though the nation paid him homage as a General and as a President, and notwith- 
standing that kings had doffed their crowns to him, when ex-president U. S. Grant re- 
turned to his Galena home following two presidential terms and a trip around the world, 
he again resumed his place as "GRANT— OUR CITIZEN". 



Source: Military Affairs, Vol. XVLL 1953 



Illustration Courtesy Of The nilnois State Historical Library 



ULYSSES S. GRANT 



A GALENA CHRONOLOGY 



1860 He moved to Galena, arriving aboard the streamer "Itasca", accom- 

panied by his wife and their four small children. 
His pre-war residence was a modest brick home at 121 High Street. 



1861 Captain U. S. Grant, answered President Abraham Lincoln's call for 

volunteers to save the Union. 



Aug. 18, 1865 Galena's greatest day - when 25,000 persons welcomed General Ulysses 
Grant home from the Civil War. 



1868 Ulysses S. Grant maintained his presidential campaign headquarters 

at the DeSoto House. 



1869-1877 Ulysses S. Grant - 18th President of the United States. 



1879 Following his two-year world tour Ex-President Grant returned to 

Galena, and was a familiar figure here, until 



1881 When he moved to New York. Expecting to return to Galena in his 

reclining years, he retained his home here. 



BORN: April 27, 1822, at Point Pleasant, Ohio. 

DIED: July 23, 1885, at McGregor, New York. 

BURIED: In Grant's Tomb, Riverside, New York. 



Chiseled 


on the sides 


of the stately granite 


shaft in 


Grant City Park, 


are 


the 


names of 


424 heroes 


of Jo Daviess County 


who made 


the supreme sacrifice 


to 


preserve 


the Union, 













THE FIRST ALL-YOUTH PROGRAM 

IN THE NATION'S CIVIL WAR OBSERVANCE 

took place in Galena April 29, 1961 




Gen. Grant III Dines in Grant Memorial Home 

An elegant 19th century party in the kerosene-lamp lighted home of his famous 
grandfather, arranged by the Department of Conservation, State of Illinois April 29, 1961. 




A Record Shattering U. S. Grant Pilgrimage 

Some of the 3,005 Boy Scouts, Explorers and Scouters from four states who took part in the 
ceremonies sponsored by the U. S. Grant Council, B. S. A., and the Galena Woman's Club. 
Gen. U. S. Grant III, Chairman, National Civil War Centennial Commission and Dr. Frank 
F. Gross, Central Commander. John T. Graves, Camp No. 516, Sons of Confederate 
Veterans, addressed the assembled scouts. —Galena Gazette Photos. 



ANNUAL GRANT FETE Boy Scout Pilgrimage, last Saturday in April. Girl Scout 
Day, first Saturday in May. Write Grant Birthday Committee, DeSoto House, Galena, 
Illinois. 

PILGRIMAGE THRU HISTORIC GALENA HOMES, sponsored by the Guild of the 
First Presbyterian Church, annually on the last weekend in September. Write Tour of 
Historic Homes, Galena, Illinois. 

Added attractions on Tour Weekend : 

MARKET DAYS held on Market Square. Contact Jo Daviess County Home Bureau, 
Elizabeth, 111. 

ART EXHIBIT in the Market House. 

VIOLET SHOW at Community Hall; write Ladies Aid, Westminster United 
Presbyterian Church, Galena, 111. 

THE SWEET SHOPPE : Write Sigma Pi Sorority, Westminster United Presbyterian 
Church, Galena, 111. 

THE BLACKSMITH SHOP: Write Williard Richardson, Galena, 111. 

OLD FASHIONED MELODRAMA: 

AVENUE OF ANTIQUES: Main Street merchants' windows display antiques, his- 
toric documents and items "out of the past". 



THE CIVIL WAR CENTENNIAL 

WILL AWAKEN RENEWED INTEREST IN GALENA, THE MOST 

PERFECTLY PRESERVED HISTORIC TOWN IN ILLINOIS 

THE U. S. GRANT PILGRIMAGE FOR BOY SCOUTS & EXPLORERS will stress 
a Civil War Centennial Commemoration theme in the Pilgrimages held on the last Sat- 
urday in April, 1961 thru 1965. Advance reservations required. Individual and unit 
awards. For details write U. S. Grant Council, Boy Scouts of America, 616 W. 
Stephenson Street, Freeport Illinois. 



CIVIL WAR CENTENNIAL COMMEMORATIONS 

Plan to be with us! 

U. S. GRANT PILGRIMAGE 

FOR BOY SCOUTS AND EXPLORERS 

7th Annual— Sat., April 29, 1961 

8th Annual— Sat., April 28, 1962 

9th Annual— Sat., April 27, 1963 

10th Annual— Sat., April 25, 1964 

11th Annual— Sat., April 24, 1965 



July 2 thru 8, 1961, A City-wide Civil War Centennial Commemoration, with num- 
erous special events and attractions. Historical pageant nightly July 4th thru 8th. 
Contact Galena Historical Society. 




Catholic — St. Mary's 
Catholic — St. Michael's . 

Episcopal — Grace 

Lutheran — St. Matthew's 
Methodist, The First 



CHURCHES 




Crack Pot 

Dowling Shop .... 
Old Store 
Rock House .. 
Taylor House 
White House 
Steamboat House 


Hwy 


20 a 


ANTIQl 

8 B-3 


" Presbyterian, The First 

B-i Presbyterian, Hill 

B-2 Presbyterian, The South 


24 B-2 

. 130 S. West St. 
51 D-l 


54 D-l 

61 C-4 

22 B-3 

. 36 C-l 

Prospect St. 



POINTS OF INTEREST 

Black Hawk War Boulder 27 A-2 

Bridge — pedestrian 18 B-4 

Bridge — U. S. 20 A E-2 

Cemetery — 1812 32 A-l 

Cobblestone Street 11 B-3 

Commission House G C-2 

County Court House - site 14 B-3 

County Courthouse 20 A-3 

De Soto House 1 C-2 

Dowling House 23 B-2 

Dowling Stone Store 15 B-3 

Farrar, Amos — Cabin 12 B-3 

Felt's Folly 40 B-2 

Fire House No. 1 44 C-2 

Fire Station 25 B-2 

Flood Gates D C-2 

Flood Dike Protection E C-2 

Frink-Walker Stage Site 6 C-2 

Gazette & Advertiser 4 C-2 

General Store 3 C-2 

Gram Houses F C-2 

Grant Memorial Home 63 D-4 

Grant's Pre-war Home 33 B-l 

Grant Park 58 D-3 

Grant Statue 59 D-3 

Grant, J. R. Store — site 7 C-2 

Grant Store — reconstructed 5 C-3 

Hotel DeSoto ...... 1 C-2 

111. Central R. R. Station 57 E-3 

Kittoe, Edw., home 28 A-2 

Levee B D-2 

Library ..... 52 D-l 

Louisville House C C-2 

Market House 9 B-3 

Market Square 10 B-3 

Methodist Manse (1st) 39 C-l 

Mineral Museum Spring St. near 54 D-l 

Museum 45 C-2 

Newhall Home 48 C-2 

Old Town ....................... 17 A-4 

Parochial School 50 B-l 

Parochial School 21 A-3 

Post Office 2 C-2 

Post Office — 1st site 13 B-3 

Quality Hill 38 B-2 

Rawlins, J. A, home 29 A-l 

Rowley. -Wax. B^tOB D — — V» » 1 

Smith, John E., home 55 E-l 

Smith, Capt. O., home 60 D-4 

Stahl, Fred, home 53 D-l 

(Hill St. . 26 B-2 

Steps .... (School 37 C-l 

(Washington St. .. 43 C-2 

Swimming Pool ..... 19 A-4 

Turner Hall 41 B-2 

Union House 62 C-4 

Panoramic 59 D-3 

View (Scenic 35 C-l 

(Old World 46 C-2 

Washburne, E. B., home 56 E-3 

EAST SIDE — 

Park Avenue and Bouthillier Street 

See The Old Town Hall and Water 
Filtration Plant 
E SHOPS 

Village Barn & Little Acres 

Highway 20-W at Division Street 
Main Antique Store 

Main & Green Streets 
Bartsch's Antiques 

408 Washington Street 
Gibson Antiques 

326 N. Main St. 




State Memorial 

OLD MARKET HOUSE 

Inside can be seen "a graphic 

exhibit of Illinois architecture"